It’s All About the Skirt: a guest post from Studio Faro

Option 21 drapeFor the skirt part of the challenge, I’ve been experimenting with folding, pleating and pinning squares and rectangles of fabric to the bodice on the dummy stand.

But the result hasn’t really captured the essence of the Six Napoleon dress.  

So it is time I hand over to the expert!  Welcome to Anita of Studio Faro as she suggests some ideas on how to recreate the skirt….

#FirstSample Skirt, the Six Napoleon Challenge

Firstly I’d like to say huge thanks to Sew2Pro for inviting me to contribute to this fabulous challenge.  And it’s so fortunate that dogstar is one of my favourite local brands producing what is most likely the most interesting designs in Australia.  So many local designers are enslaved to overseas trends and fail to develop a distinct design aesthetic.  Not so dogstar!

I’m late to the party so I won’t be covering the bodice development but offering some ideas for the development of the skirt pattern.  Initially I came up with at least three different ways to get at this pattern and I’ve decided to share the most interesting with you here on the Sew2Pro blog.

1 NAP6_draft_1

The first thing that caught my eye in the fabulous dress was the dipped hem in the front and the beautiful and generous hem allowance all so obvious in the transparent silk organza. My challenge was to find a way to cut this skirt so that the front dip was in fact a right angle. Very similar to drafting a circle skirt and leaving the corners on! 

The draft above is how I decided to use 2 metres of polyester organza to replicate the skirt of the Six Napoleon Dress. The cut is based on the width of the fabric (140cm), halved to determine the length of the skirt (70cm), of which 11cm will be the hem turning (to finish at 10cm) and the remaining 59cm are the skirt length. This also presents an opportunity to produce a zero-waste pattern.

Where the skirt has a dip in the hem I’ll be using the corner sections of the cut with a mitre in the very deep hem. There will be one dip in the front and one in the back.

1 NAP6_cut_1

 

The preparation of the skirt for draping goes like this:

  1. Cut the cloth into two pieces along the cut lines and trim the excess from the mitre seams.
  2. Press under the 1cm turning on the deep hem edges and sew the mitre seams.
  3. Join the two side seams using a French seam or equivalent to avoid the use of overlocking.
  4. Press the 10cm deep hem and pin in place and sew.

1 nap6 skirt

Mark the bottom edge of your bodice on your workroom dummy as a guideline for the draping of the skirt.  Please note where I have indicated for you to pin the longest part of the skirt in the front and back.1 nap6 bodice seam

Begin by pinning the corner of the waist seam to the front right and back left as indicated.  Then space the pleating out for each section of the skirt.

1 6nap top skirt

You can manage the direction and fall of each pleat by shifting it above the bodice seam to get the best drape.  The excess above the seamline will be trimmed back to the seam line plus seam allowance (1cm).

As you can see below, the #FirstSample is a reasonable success.  The high/low in the hemline is there and the effect of the deep hem is maintained.  However I do think this would work a lot better with 3 metres of organza for this layer.  That way there’d be a lot more in the pleating around the waist.

1 final sampleFor the lining of this skirt I’d recommend you use a lining cloth of 150cm width and follow the exact same process giving you an underskirt or lining that’ll be 5cm longer than the organza layer.

And of course we must not forget the opening for the dress!  I intend to slash through on the left side of the skirt for a side seam and mark a notch at 15-18cm where the zip is most likely to end.

There are other methods of working on this skirt pattern and I’m looking forward to seeing them in your own workings.  I’ll be sharing my other methods on my blog well-suited in the coming weeks.  I’m so looking forward to seeing all your wonderful dresses when they’re finished.

Thank you so much Anita!  I’m much indebted.  And I look forward to reading more on well-suited (readers, please do subscribe so as to receive Anita’s updates).  

Here’s a round-up of everyone’s progress.  If I’ve left you out, please leave a comment and a link so I can add you.

Mary, a professional couturier, has explained her bodice-making process in this post.

You can ake the bodice only as my friend Jo is doing.

Fabrickated is under strict supervision of her pattern-cutting tutor Vanda who will not let her settle for second-best.  But isn’t the end of term nigh?  Won’t Kate be saved by the bell?!

Of all the bloggers here, Stephanie in Ottawa has the least drafting experience.  Yet her bodice is perfect.  Will she complete the conundrum that is the skirt with the same high standards and attention to detail?

Stephanie on the other side (Ernie K Designs in Seattle) has written a great analysis of pleats evident in the skirt which helped me visualise where I was going wrong with my rectangles.

Demented Fairy is still marking papers but is steaming with enthusiasm to get stuck in.  She also has the expertise, experience and great fabric.

Ruth who is also a teacher gave most of us a massive head start but is back in the sewing room and has now outlined her splendid plan here.  She’s also found a literary connection to the name for this dress.  It turns out it’s just as much about Sherlock Holmes as it is about the French general.

Pella of Pattern Pandemonium has been intrigued enough to experiment with both the bodice and the skirt but hasn’t got the incentive to make the final article.  Will somebody please invite her daughter to a summer ball!  Maybe Anita’s instructions will inspire her to get back to the stand and make is for herself.

As for me, I’m going away.  I’ll be following your progress eagerly and I’ll hopefully be able to leave comments on your posts but no sewing machine anywhere for me.  Which will be hard.

Anyone else tempted to join us?  The deadline for your images and/or posts is the weekend of 6-7 August.

Mummy Dearest

1t jean bodiceThe Six Napoleon Challenge: I am officially postponing the deadline, for two reasons. Firstly, to enable Ruth and Demented Fairy, our teachers/lecturers one of whom is still marking papers, to join us and to add their esteemed grey matter and wealth of sewing experience into the mix.

And, because I have enlisted the help of Anita from Studio Faro.  Anita is a pattern-drafting expert and teacher who demystifies mind-boggling designs in the Pattern Puzzle section of her blog.  She will write a guest post here once she has cleared her current commitments.  This will be followed by something on the Studio Faro blog.

Guys, we’re in good hands!  🙂

Thank you Anita, I’m very grateful.

Challengers: could I ask you to submit something by the first weekend of August (6-7), which is a few days after I come back from my holiday?  I will aim to put everything together on the 8 August.   Apologies to those who feel like you’ve had to rush it, but I trust this will help you.  Or maybe you’re cursing my name because of the inevitability of Parkinson’ Law kicking in, by which I mean that work will drag out to fill the time available!

I’ve got an exciting little deadline to fill the first part of the weekend.  On Wednesday, my daughter announced we should go to a charity fundraising ball at her school on Saturday night because at the beginning of the event she will be doing a dance she has choreographed with a friend, previously scheduled for the Summer Fair but cancelled.  I’d known about the event for some time but was quite keen not to go, not because the tickets are expensive (the aren’t) but because it’s a ‘formal attire’ evening.  It now turns out it’s the only chance I’ll have to see the dance performed on stage.   Daughter will need a dress to wear once her performance is over and she can join us.  In her innocence she planned on wearing her now very tight and slightly stained Tudor Tyrant costume but I suspect a satin fancy dress isn’t the look the organisers are aiming for!  So I reached again for the cling-film, wrapped her up and made this…

1 connie's cling film form

She is a bigger girl than when I last sewed for her exactly a year ago.  There might even be a bust dart in there somewhere!  I now have just over a day to produce a formal dress, using my petroleum-smelling cheap polyester which happens to be in a colour she loves (it’s still stiffened with gelatine).  She’d like me to make something like the beautiful green Greek Goddess dress you can just about see in the top picture which a friend would like fixed after another dressmaker bodged it (no pressure there then…).  But I can only make something very simple in the time.  If I fail (there are 4 errands requiring car trips between now and then), there is always a chance the charity shops will have something lovely in her size.

1 maskeDid I mention it was a masked ball?  We’re making masks too!  If only it wasn’t so windy today and the spray paint didn’t end up on my toes!!  I bought a pack of paper masks and covered two in glue and strips of gauze before painting.  I like the rough texture this has created.

Did I mention I love an adrenaline rush?  And that I’ve replaced my meals with tea so the time I save on preparing and eating food I spend instead …  on the loo 😯   ?

And oh, look: I’ve rescued the black bodice.  I took the advice of reader Sridevi and levelled the tail-like back.  The zip is an open-ended one used for jackets which makes it easy to get in and out of.  But it’s too long.  I don’t know whether to look for a shorter one – what are the odds of finding a 23.5cm open-ended zip? – or to snip this one and tuck the ends inside.   Available zip lengths  is definitely something to consider when drafting this as a bodice alone.  Bonne chance, mes amis. 1 bodice-horz