Elna and Maxine

elna maxine

mullet free zone signThe dress on the left belongs to a client who bought it for £5 at an H&M sale (why, oh why wasn’t I at this sale?).  The original hem was all one length – a bit nunny – which didn’t do justice to the rather sensual upper half of the dress so the client asked me to convert it to a fishtail.  Some of you would call this kind of hem a mullet but I absolutely refuse to work with that term!  I haven’t seen the dress actually worn by the client yet.  In the photo it’s a bit wind-blown but otherwise I think it looks great and I enjoyed my little job.

a back viewI’d love to copy this design and make it for myself in some interesting drapey fabric as everything about it appeals to me.  The centre front panel is stretch mesh; the arrangement of the spaghetti straps is beautiful and the back isn’t overlooked either.  Elements of the design would translate well into a swimming costume or a jumpsuit too.  But where to start?  Do you have any recommendations for software that would convert a drawing into a technical one or what to use to make a paper pattern into a PDF?

Soon as I was asked to do this, my Elna stopped working.  As my client mentioned she sews too (but didn’t fancy tackling a curved hem), I asked if I could use her machine.  She messaged me to say yes but that her ‘Maxine’ is a very basic one.  I thought,  “Uh oh, what kind of a budget make is Maxine?”  but this turned out to be a mobile phone auto-correct for Janome.  Phew!

Barista cuffsTo familiarise with Maxine before tackling the fishtail, I spent a few hours fixing a dress of my own.  This is something I made 2 years ago by hacking into the Anna pattern.  My dress was originally ochre with brown cuffs which, I discovered, looked exactly like the Costa uniform – it’s clear that subconsciously I want to work there and live off Flat Whites and Carrot Cake…   close up of anna dartsAfter I dyed it brown, the dress became one of the most wearable things I’d ever made (blogged here) but I soon splashed bleach on it while cleaning the toilet.  I was so upset.  I needed to go darker to disguise the mess so black it had to be.  This meant the brown zip had to be replaced and all the stitching had to be redone a millimetre or so inside the original construction seams and also on the hem and the neckline.  Otherwise, any strain on the seams and the brown stitching would show  just like when someone with brown or red hair dyes it black and a few weeks later they get ‘hot roots.’ 

a close up of 3 stitchingsIn this photo you can see three colours of stitching on one of the waist darts, right to left: ochre, brown and black.  This may seem rather a lot of work for rather an unremarkable-looking dress but I love it for so many reasons.  It’s warm (pincord) and therefore perfect for those days at either side of summer.  Its softness makes me very huggable when I wear it (apparently) and as it’s so simple, it’s great for showing off any jewellery.  And for getting a bit of sun on my arms.

But yes, it would have been quicker to make a new one.  Do you think it’s worth doing jobs like this or is it simpler to start anew?