Prepping

1 drawing

Masayo Yasuki

Masayo Yasuki of dogstar (click for source interview)

I left a message on the dogstar Clothing Facebook page to promote our challenging task of recreating the Six Napoleon dress, and Masayo Yasuki, dogstar designer, very nicely got in touch saying:

The biggest hurdle I would have to say is the 8 meters of silk organza that makes up the skirt… not to mention the 6 meters of lining!

Fourteen metres in the skirt!  😯

Option 2-horzThis gave food for thought.  Firstly, if it took so much fabric to make the skirt, then that dress was a bargain.  Second: that amount in anything other than the lightest fabrics is going to be heavy (when in my ill-advised moment I bought  8 metres of polyester recently, I soon got tired dragging the bag about town with me.)  So either reduce the volume of folds in the skirt or pick something that won’t cause your back to collapse if you intend to wear the dress for dancing or standing about.

I wonder if gauze – available in widths of about 90cm/36″ –  could work?  My grandma used gauze for everything from straining mozzarella to making a camomile tea compress to put on my itchy eyes during hayfever but I have no experience of sewing it and I wonder if there’s a drawback to doing so.  It’s cheap to buy online – so long as you don’t opt for the sterilised strips used for bandages!  – and being cotton it should dye well though there’d be some shrinkage.

Despite a very busy schedule, Kate is also taking part in the challenge (yay! 🙂 ).  In a discussion on her Corseted Dress Challenge post,  the option of making the skirt as a separate was discussed.  1 pleated trimThe skirt could fit under the bodice like a petticoat or it could go on top: I’d prefer the latter.  I would attach it to the edge of the bodice with a trim on the top of the skirt hiding the basting stitches.  I like the idea of a narrow pleated ribbon, like a finer version of the trim made by one of the contestants in the current series of the Great British Sewing Bee (an interesting technique of tucking fabric into folds of card and pressing: see 46 minutes into Episode 1)?  In the picture below, you can see a similar trim separating the lowered bodice from the skirt on the dress worn by Peggy of Made Men, though this has a ruffled/ruched appearance whereas what I imagine is more like the surround on a rosette.

Mad Men Challenge

Below are other ideas that have harangued me and which I’ve tried to sort in an attempt at organization before I begin to draft, as well as links to other posts which may help you in this or other projects.  It’s still not too late to join us brave muskateers who are going to give this a try: let me know if the timing of the deadline is putting you off.

1 measuring angles

Part One: Bodice

1 ribbon on bodiceI’ve been trying to pin ribbons to my dummy to replicate the dipped edge of the bodice.  I was underwhelmed with the results so to get more accurate angles, I made a tracing of the original photo of the dress by putting paper on my computer with the brightness up.  I measured the angles with a protractor using an imaginary horizontal hem as a baseline (see big picture above).  My measurements (approximate) are: left angle is 25°; the larger angle on the right is 55°.

1 measuring angle

Bodice back

Pella, an experienced pattern drafter who has already made a great start on this challenge, pointed out that we don’t know what is going on at the back.  It could be straight but I think not.  I’ll keep the bodice dips but make them slightly higher than at the front to avoid the skirt bulging out in the same place as does my pear-shaped bottom (ha!).

This weekend I am going to try a little experiment to hopefully help me with the close-fitting bodice design.  Below is a hint: can you guess what I’ll do!?  (um, I don’t know Marianna.  Dance around like weirdo?)

Princess seams

Before sewing princess seams, I like to staystitch all the curved areas to 1-2mm of the stitching line and then clip right up to the staystitch.  As for the rest, here’s one of my much visited posts on sewing princess seams.

Boning

I have found an endless number of posts relating to boning on Gertie’s website.  Interestingly, those folksy German dresses have boning on either side of the front-laced opening so that the bodice doesn’t crumple during dressing/undressing.  For the Six Nap dress, boning isn’t necessary but if like me you’re desperate to give it a try, this tip from Iconic Patterns should ensure the strips don’t dig into your leg: sit down in front of a mirror with a tape around your waist and measure the distance from the waist to the top of thigh: do not exceed this measurement.

Part Two: Draping

I’m sensing the limitations of Anne, my cheap display dummy.  How much easier it would be to wield yardage of fabric on a half-scale model such as Pella has.  Even just a heavy metal base would improve Anne: she wouldn’t threaten to topple as I turn her while winding lots of fabric around.

Improvisation

1 improvised draping

This image is from the Improvisational Draping chapter of Draping: the Complete Course Book, where the author picks a V Westwood dress as the inspiration and suggests you begin by drawing grainlines where they can be ascertained.  This sounds like good advice though I’m not sure I understand the bottom right arrow.  It will make sense when I give it a go.

Mille feuille  💡

You know those cream cakes made of many layers of thin pastry?  Certain other design on the dogstar FB page with similar multi-layered skirt effect reminds me of cakes so I’m wondering if instead of pleating large swathes of fabric to mimic 6 Nap, I could get squares of say 80cm x 80cm,  some folded along the straightgrain and pinned to the bodice and some on the bias creating a handkerchief hem.  I think that will be my first experiment.  Luckily, our laundry cupboard is full of worn duvets covers that I can sacrifice.

Lastly, if you’re new to drafting and don’t know how to add seam allowances to your design, here’s a post from before.

Enough!  I sleep now.  You sleep already!?

But…. Except…  During my last excursion to Goldhawk Road I spotted some black, tightly woven, shiny fabric I think might be ideal for the bodice.  I’m going back either on 17th or 18th June (Friday – Saturday) to buy it and check the prices of organza too.  If anyone would like to join me (and curb my spending enthusiasm ) email me with your preferred day.

Thanks for reading!  Hope it helps.

Inside Job

1 the dress

Here’s the dress, inside out and almost finished.  It’s hanging for a day or so before getting hemmed.  One of the front seams is machine-basted to the mid-thigh as I wanted the option of having a split.  I asked my daughter if I should be daring and go for it, or keep it sewn up.  Somewhat to my surprise she said the former!

1 silk butterfliesBut the other option – to attach a cascade of six or seven silk origami butterflies from one side of the upper bust down to the split on the other side, I decided against.  I think the dress itself looks like a butterfly.

I didn’t know how to line it while maintaining the characteristics of the fabric.  A fully self-lined option would have been very expensive as I’d have needed about 10m of fabric.  Other options would have compromised the construction of the split – which will inevitably fall open when I sit and flap about in the breeze exposing seams and under or partial lining.  So I self-lined to just below the zip (which is on the side) and made 6 metres of bias binding – litres of water going into the steam-pressing during this production! – with which I bound the lower sections of the princess seams, ‘Hong Kong finish’ style.  1 bbThe lucky by-product of this is that all that fabric that went into making the binding has made the dress heavier and given it more of a drape: something I was genuinely relieved about as the fabric, while being a perfect choice of colour, didn’t have the gravitas of the thicker silk crepes.

1 hong kong seam finish

I’m tempting fate by leaving it to almost the last minute to finish it.  Maybe I need that slightly panicky rush of adrenaline I felt when I first cut into the fabric some 10 days ago.  But you, reader, are not to be so silly!  That important wedding you’re sewing for in August?  Don’t wait till the end of July.  Give any potential iron brandings time to heal, and those scratches down the arms from fitting the dress while it’s pinned! 🙂

Also the machine could stop working…   Or… or…  I could give the whole thing a final painstaking press then whip it off the ironing board in a celebratory manner only to discover I’d been standing on the end of it…  and it’s ripped. I’ve been sewing barefoot just to prevent this; I was surprised by how many times I’d sit down at the machine and find the ends of the dress under my feet or the chair wheels.

So Many Muslins

1 wearable muslin in Liberty silk

Option 2-horz

I left the decision of which dress to make for the big day to my significant other. He looked at the shortlist and quickly with no agonising chose the last.

I didn’t question this. Perhaps I should have, as in the picture the dress features hardly at all.  I mean, what did he think was going on there?  What if he’d been influenced by the colours whereas I had only been looking at the styles? (I have no intention of using grey or black.)

1 Double Dungarees

What they were wearing in 2000: dungarees!!

Maybe his decision was self-interested and he’d disregarded the first two because he didn’t want to look underdressed alongside me?

Anyway, I set to work. first padding out the narrow waist of my display dummy Anne (as in ‘Boleyn’ – geddit!?) with a layer of wadding to make it the same size as mine.  Admittedly it looks a little lumpy and unprofessional but my daughter finds Anne quite huggable now.  Just like mummy, she says.

Then I began drafting the sleeve, the distinguishing feature of the dressless dress!

1 sleeve pattern from PInterestBack in September when I made the prototype, I magnified the pattern piece from the original Pinterest picture until it fit my blouse’s armscye.  (in case you’re interested, I made a PDF which you can download).

1 sdWhile it looked good enough in a shirting fabric, the sleeve I ended up with told only half the story!  Mine is a typical gathered sleeve with an interesting ‘epaulette’ whereas the original has more fullness and soft pleats.  I think I’ve more or less worked out how it’s done: at the top and below in the very last picture you can see I’ve  made a wearable muslin (using printed Liberty silk leftover from my BHL Sarah pattern-test).  I worry somewhat that it isn’t good enough, or that when the dress is finally finished it won’t suit me but it’s too late to backtrack.

The pattern I’m using this time is this (I forgot to make all the markings, including ‘on fold’).  Can you see a subtle difference?  I’ve underlined with silk organza so the sleeves don’t crumple.

1 sleeve pattern

A choice of silks, in UK Fabrics

A choice of silks, in UK Fabrics

As for the dress part, after a preliminary look at the choices in Goldhawk Road, I settled for the idea of a maxi princess dress in silk, with maybe a couple of surprise details thrown in if all goes well, but hoping to find a silk that’s suitably heavy with sufficient drape.

Then the toiling began. I started from Winifred Aldrich’s close-fitting bodice block but it really needed to get closer and closer: a couple of adjustments were made at the bust and a few more at the back.

Look at these carcasses!

1 first muslins

1 close up

Toile number… I forget

It’s hard to get an idea of what one’s back looks using a mirror so with a tripod and a camera on a self-timer, I took photos of my back with arms relaxed by my sides and made adjustments to the pattern once I’d measured what I’ve taken in with pins.  Luckily, as I seemed to be shaving more than adding, I didn’t waste paper starting afresh with each alteration (and if I do need to add to a pattern, I tend to ‘extend’ by gluing a strip of scrap to the underneath of the original).

I’ll be using the same method to get an even closer fit for my Six Napoleon bodice,

1 I'll be waiting in the direction of the kitchen door

I made a longer version too.

I was slightly alarmed that after two weeks of tinkering, I had nothing concrete to show for my efforts except a pile of muslins. But as anyone who has painted walls or woodwork properly may tell you: preparation is everything!

Geez, I hope they’re right.  I mean, what do I know, I don’t paint….

Then panic set in. I went back to Goldhawk Road and suddenly the choices seemed both limited and overwhelming.  At about £15 a metre  for 115cm wide silk, mistakes could prove expensive, and shops are generally unwilling to offer samples to mull over, instead inviting you to take photos.  As any sewist knows, this gives no idea of the feel or weight and is rather misleading when it comes to colour too.

£20 Liberty silk from Classic Fabrics

£20 Liberty silk from Classic Fabrics

In Classic Fabrics, there was a tempting choice of Liberty printed silks, exactly the same weight as my muslin below, but I thought the graphics would detract from the sleeve design.  I wanted a solid, ideally a blue or green from a palette created by sheer serendipity when Connie printed off and coloured in felt tips this dragon which also probably reminds her of ma:

1 Colour inspiration

So with just over 2 weeks to go, I went to Woolcrest Textiles to see what they got!   It was a sunny Saturday afternoon.  The atmosphere in Hackney was vibrant: so refreshingly different from the suburbs and a feast for the eyes if you’re into people-watching.  But not for the squeamish perhaps:  just as I turned off Mare Street, I was accosted rather rudely  😯   Or at least I assume the offer was rude – I haven’t actually Googled ‘poom-poom’ yet  🙂

Woolcrest is huge, sporadically lit and precariously stacked to the vaults with bolts.  I strained my forearm lifting down something (the three members of staff I met were very kind and helpful, but just as small as me so I didn’t bother asking for help).  But I found a fabric of the right colour and weight: a silky-satin (i.e. polyester) in teal which I’ve established suits me.  At £2 a very wide metre, I couldn’t believe my luck.  It seemed silly not to buy masses of the stuff.   I was in such a good mood, almost laughing at the thought that my special dress will come from the sort of place the outside of which looks like where you go to buy a kidney, and not off the original donor!  By Sunday night, the dimpled-looking silky fabric (which remained dimpled despite repeated pressing) was washed, cut and stay-stitched.  By Tuesday, the sleeves were done, backed with organza and looking nice and soft.  Most of the dress was done too: and….  well… it crackled with static when I slipped it over my head….

By Wednesday, having learnt first-hand that the old adage ‘buy cheap, buy twice’ is true, I was in Goldhawk Road again settling for a silk crepe, a touch on the floaty side, in a deep turquoise.  Reader, one of the sleeves below is £2 a metre in a silky fabric that when pressed smells slightly of an oil slick and the other is £16 silk.  You better be able to tell which is which!1 sleeves 1 and 2

1 sleeve1-horz

So, I have a week.

1 Liberty wearable muslin

The Deadline

I don’t know if I’m going to pull this off but I need a special occasion dress to wear in just under 4 weeks’ time.

It should showcase what I’m capable of – in case anyone’ll be looking – without being fussy or formal.

Recently I’ve been giving the matter some thought and have decided to copy one of three designs:

Option 1: Six Napoleon Dress

Option 2By Masayo Yasuki, of the fashion house ‘dogstar’, this has an asymmetric boned bodice with sheer drapery redolent, in both the style lines and the volume of drapery, of Vivienne Westwood.  This caught my eye a while back on Pinterest and the trail leads to this website where the description reads, with spellings corrected: “featuring carefully placed tucks and a well fitted corset, who can resist the luxury and fullness in its 8 metres of silk organza?”

Well, that should narrow down the fabric search.

I’ve made a muslin of the bodice which was easy enough but I now wish I’d paid more attention when those of you who teach me stuff talked about Draping.

Difficulty level = 8/10

I really think it’s time I tackled draping.  I have an aversion to travelling to courses but I’m good at self-taught so if you know of a book that will demystify the process, I’d be grateful for a recommendation.

Option 2: Pleated Neckline Dress

option 1

I’d already been experimenting with my own pleated neckline designs when I discovered this picture on Pinterest.  The trail takes me to the website of Eileen Fisher but nothing in the designer’s current collection is like this.  Everything about it appeals.  I love the straps and I can just imagine how sensual it would be to bury fingers in those midriff folds.  The wine stain colour is gorgeous too, but not essential.

Difficulty: 5/10

How do you envisage this dress ending?  I mean, what should happen in the lower half?

Option 3: Sleeve Drama

pinterest sourceNot much dress visible here: the sleeves steal the show.  I’ve experimented with this design a lot, firstly by making a simplified version and putting it onto a refashioned men’s shirt (you can download the pattern PDF).  I’ve now fine-tuned the pattern to be more like that in the original above.  The rest of the dress would be long with princess seams, and also a thigh split like in the BHL Anna dress.Anna Stride

Difficulty = 4/10

And talking of the Anna dress, that’s my back up if I run out of time.  It would be a shame though.  Flattering as it may be, neither the workmanship nor materials are special (Anna’s more of a t-shirt than a special occasion dress).

1 so many sleeves, so few armsOr I could go to Liberty’s, where while gallivanting around with Ruth last autumn I spotted dresses that would be perfect, made by proper designers.  Yeah, and spend the rest of my days in self-loathing.

So many sleeves, so few arms…

Like I said, no pressure.

I have already made my decision and begun work on one of the above but I’d love to hear what you’d do.

Jane Eyre Dress

1 Gathering Jane Eyre1 Sew 2 pro Jane EyreI like to play around with the ‘governess dress’ theme and the brief I gave myself for this year’s version was ‘demure… or deadly?’

(You do realise, I hope, that almost everything I do and say is tongue-in-cheek 🙂 )

The fabric is pincord, the finest known to humanity.  Over the last few years I’ve made many dresses and shirts out of this and will continue to do so till I run out of supply (this current batch is from Rolls and Rems in Lewisham). I love its softness and warmth; it has substance yet for some designs, say a circle skirt, there is the necessary drape too.  I would have liked the contrasting detail to be just white in a crisp cotton or silk (for a particularly strict governess look) but I worried that the repeated washing would cause the black dye to spoil the whiteness.  The tartan is, I think, a good compromise and on the few occasions I have worn this I’ve been given the thumbs up.

Back in March while making this, I listened to a dramatized serial of Jane Eyre on Radio 4 with what I consider to be among the most interesting young actors around, Amanda Hale and Tom Burke, in the main roles.  As I worked on my governess dress, I imagined it on Jane. Here she is, pattering lightly on the stone-flagged floors of draughty Thornfield Hall, dabbing at her permanently dripping nose.  That’s what one of those big, pouchy pockets is for – a hanky! 1 Jane Eyre

The other pocket’s a money bag.  When he remembers, Mr Rochester tends to issue his wages in half-yearly lumps.  But reader, don’t hold it against him, for we have traveled into the past, where there are no nice shops and no stuff to buy.

1 Back View1 Inside outThe back is shaped by two contour darts, the sleeves are ‘bracelet length’ and there’s a side zip.  Do you like how I’ve used tartan leftovers on the inside, including a bias strip as hemming?

Email me if you would like to buy a pattern of this dress which I can design to your measurements. The fit is similar to a shift dress but with room at the front due to the volume from the bust dart gathering.  Being above the knee, it has a sixties, mod vibe.  The level of skill: intermediate.

Link: Quiz: How Jane Eyre are you

1 Je

Bolero

1 bolero1 hm 2007A few years ago I saw the exhibition of ballgowns at the V&A. One particular exhibit impressed me and it wasn’t a ballgown but a dress and bolero worn by Helen Mirren at the BAFTAs 2007 ceremony.  The design by Jacques Azagury wasn’t particularly complicated (I stood very close).  I think it owes its success to the fabrics.  Silk taffeta is rather like Mirren herself: shimmering, crisp, nacreous!  And the two colours suited her and each other perfectly: champagne and a mushroom brown.  Here’s a gallery of some notable dresses of that evening.  Which dress do you think should get an award?  Notice that it hardly matters how Mirren’s bolero is wrinkled.  It’s  very wearable.

1 bolero on dummyI decided to make a bolero using an old Ikea curtain: it’s a thick cotton which looks like denim but without the diagonal weave.  The purpose wasn’t to acquire another item for the wardrobe but rather to check the fit of my new bodice block which I made from the Winifred Aldrich instructions (I also used her instructions for the two-piece sleeve).  I wanted it to be as close-fitting as possible as I have in mind some designs for which little or no ease in the bodice is required.  I gave myself more bust coverage than in the original.  The shoulder seam dart is exactly as in the block which is a bit of an oversight (too close to the edge) but I didn’t trouble myself to move it as I was still thinking this was just a muslin.

1 inside boleroBut soon as I realised the fit was fine, avarice took over and I wanted Mirren’s bolero with ruffles!  The lining is some lovely soft stuff from the stash (bought for the Blue Velvet dress).  What a difference it’s made!  Not only does this now look cute on the inside (there’s even an ease pleat at centre back), but for such a close-fitting jacket, it slips on and off like a dream.

I really like it but… oh no, look at the back!  A bolero looks really bad with jeans.  And skirts or anything with a waist seam.  Damn, I’m gonna have to make another dress….. As with Mirren’s empire line, the essential requirement is that no horizontal seams appear in view below the hem.    1 back

Hm, maybe it’s time for the annual unearthing of my New Look 6459 pattern, with a side closure alteration.

Iconic Patterns recently released a Bolero pattern  which should be an easy make if you’re not inclined to draft your own.  Perfect for a summer afternoon at a party with Pimms (in an English garden, waiting for the sun).

Pencil Skirt with Fish Tail

1 fishtail1 3 fishtailFor Christmas my husband gave me Winifred Aldrich’s ‘Metric Pattern Cutting For Women’s Wear’.  (Fantastic!  How did he know?!)  I made the ‘Natural Waist’ Basic Skirt Block from Part One: Form Cutting.  The fit is really good.  The only adjustment needed was not to curve out 0.5cm from waist to hip but to keep the line almost straight.  Also I narrowed the side-to-hem by 3.5cm rather than the 2.5cm  suggested for the pencil skirt adjustment.  2 close up

But a skirt this narrow has to give, or else there’d be hobbling, which is why there’s interesting stuff at the back…  I transferred the outer of the two back darts to a diagonal line on the centre back seam in a process outlined a year ago (the Simple Dart Throw post).  I cut away a section and inserted a fish tail which is made up of a quarter-circle shape folded twice, concertina style.  It took a bit of playing around to get the half-decent result I’d hoped for (ok, so there was a bit of bodging!). 1 pattern-horz

Next time I’ll do the sewing in a different order, with the dart done last,  the side seam first and the horizontal seam second at which point the two back pieces are joined at the centre back.

Drape and Hem Considerations1 side fish

I need to give some thought to materials.  For this first draft, I used some wool from the stash.  I’d love to redo this in chambray – or anything you may suggest tha would mean the folds fall nicely.  But what about the hem?  A pencil skirt looks best with a deep hem allowance, yet the fishtail extension needs a very small seam allowance (here I kind of graded from 2cm to 1cm as you can see below in the inside out picture).

Or, can you see this in a combination of fabric?!  Denim and jersey or something that doesn’t need hemming?  I wonder if it’d matter that both the wrong and the right sides of the fabric show in the folds.  Let me know what you’d do.

1 inside out

Sun-snatching

What a treat to have a bit of sunshine these last few days (even if it’s cold), not least because the colours in everything stand out.  I think I’m being ‘courted’ by some robins because every time I approach the back windows, two or three appear on the fences, puffing out their russety chests!

I took these pictures after a quick run in the sun (and shower) so excuse the ratty hair.  Because this skirt definitely deserves dedicated styling to pull off a femme fatale look.  Which I’m not sure is my thing, but imagine pairing this with seamed stockings and killer heels.  You’d be known by the trail of dead!  1.2

Borgen Blouse

1 ties

1 DSCN6961
Mirror image

Last month I arranged a meet-up with Ruth while she was briefly in London.  We recognised each other immediately.  Well, I have been a follower of her blog Core Couture for several years!  I examined her Merchant and Mills coat and ‘Vivienne Westwooddress at close quarters and can confirm the standard of said garments was impressively high, even better in light of day than the photos suggest  🙂  As for the vivacious blonde that I expected, she was there alright, complete with a melodic Irish accent but somehow more petite than I’d imagined.  Which I told her!  1 ruth liberty

Rick Owens Shearling Peplum Jacket, Liberty London.

Rick Owens Shearling Peplum Jacket, Liberty London.

This is something that’s been remarked upon before: sewing bloggers look smaller IRL than we do on screen.  Why do you think that is (or, do you agree)?  Maybe in the pictures taken in our living rooms and gardens, we ‘fill’ the frame, whereas in real life we’re surrounded by big spaces?

Our rendezvous was Liberty’s.  We had a look at some of the designer wear on the first floor and felt thankful that we were skilled enough to be able to recreate many (though not all – see left) of these garments at a fraction of their RTW price – if we wanted to.  Ruth’s dress was a perfect example of this.  I felt happy that I’d played a small part in prompting her to make it.

I got a present!  A bundle of sewing patterns wrapped in a length of fabric.  It’s wool, possibly a blend, with a nice amount of drape for it to rest against the skin cosily – great for right now while winter and autumn are battling it out.  I love the muted colours. 1 ice The warm tones I’ve overlooked over the years but the rest – black, ‘envelope blue’ and green – are totally my palette. In fact, I was hunting for a zip for a green dress I was making so Ruth and I walked over to the new MacCulloch and Wallis premises for a bit of habby shopping before checking out the stores on Berwick Street.  As the afternoon darkened, I got the feeling we were walking against the tide: workers rushing to tube stations for their Friday night getaway, pushing into pubs, not to mention the semi-manic shoppers stlll jostling about.  I hope we get a chance to meet again, soon 🙂

1 sketchI mulled over what to make with my new fabric then by chance I found a sketch in  my old notebook that I drew while  watching ‘Borgen‘ (the Castle) years ago.  This was a really good Danish series about a fictional female Prime Minister who’s not only a consummate politician but so attractive that my husband pretended to watch the series with me!  The ‘slash with side bow’ blouse was worn by the another character, the young political journalist.  It was black which created a stunning contrast against Katrine’s blond hair and pale skin.  If I make this again, I’ll  go for a block colour and try a big, more confrontational bow!  1 inside

I drafted the slash and bow blouse pretty quickly from my bodice block, cutting at the upper bust line then playing with strips of paper till I worked out the two lengths of the bow on the side.  The big sleeves are Colette Aster Flutter Sleeves.  Here’s the view of the slash on the inside, showing the facing.  The bow section is double sided.

Anyway, I seem to recall Ruth is also a fan of Scandi Drama.  She once made jeans like the brown leather ones worn by Saga in the Bridge.  Now that’s daring!

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Asymmetric Skirt

1 Asymmetry1 sportsmax green leather skirtThis style of faux-wrap, double-fronted design has been on my radar for a while, ever since  I snapped a Sportmax green leather number in a waiting-room magazine (in November 13, the camera roll suggests).  Imagine that buttersoft, slippery leather (and the colour is a feast for the eyes)!  But so expensive!  My version – made of a polyester/viscose blend with a kind of shiny, tarry finish – cost £6, plus thread and zip.  🙂

I’m keeping it real.

Hence the washing on the line…

1 interrogation suits

I haven’t had to dip into my winter wardrobe much as the weather has been mild.  However, last month while getting ready for an evening at Kate’s, I opened my ‘drawer of black tights’ and found so many imperfect-but-not-quite-destroyed pairs that I decided some short skirts might be necessary in order to retire (to borrow the term from Blade Runner) each pair till it’s bin-ready.  This is a practical style, almost perfect for my needs (see end).  It’s short but not obviously so due to the varying hem length (which you can adapt to taste).  Construction’s easy too, the basic skirt block or a pencil skirt pattern being the starting point (with a centre back zip and waist facing).  The split front enables walking ease without the need for lining so making it is quick.

Drafting

1 Begin with the basic skirt block but narrow your pattern pieces towards the hem.

1 Begin with the basic skirt block but narrow your pattern pieces towards the hem (see first note below).

2 Copy skirt front. With darts closed, restyle your inner front, being as daring as you like.

2 Copy skirt front. With darts closed, restyle your inner front, being as daring as you like.

3 Copy the front again and restyle outer front to complement the inner front. You don't have to create a dipped hem but its very fashionable you know!

3 Copy the front again and restyle outer front to complement the inner front. You don’t have to create a dipped hem but it’s very fashionable, you know!  NB See last note regarding grainline placement.

Notes:

  • Redraw the sides of your basic block to hug the figure as closely as possible  i.e. narrow the block towards the hem.  You’ll still be able to walk due to the front split.  However, if you keep the vertical side seams of the basic block, the result with be a more flared, A-line silhouette like on my skirt.
  • Do decide whether to hem the back and the two fronts before attaching them to each other, or to leave the hemming till the end in which case the hem allowances will have to drafted equally all the way around  (i.e. if the skirt back has a 3cm hem allowance, you’ll have to draw this for the dipping hem too.
  • .I have deliberately made this to look like the front is dipping down.  You can exaggerate this more (be bold) or change to a straight hem like in the leather skirt.
Grainline options: from barmy (blue) to boring (green)
Grainline options: from barmy (blue) to boring (green)

 

  • It would be a shame to place a dipped pattern piece on the straight grain (green arrow).  Use a patterned fabric or napped fabric and play around.  I think the desired effect is meant to look a bit like a kilt left open or a tea-towel tucked into the waistband that’s slipping off!
  • Remember to stay-stitch diagonal lines to prevent stretching (why not chalk a line and staystitch before cutting from your fabric?)

1 with two peas ina pod

The only thing I’m not happy about is the itchy waist: my tights have an annoying tendency to slip down.  Hopefully, once I start wearing more layers I can tuck something in, to shield me from £6 a metre mock wool!

Or I might attempt this again in neoprene or scuba which I’ve never sewn before: do let me know if you have any experience of sewing or wearing these fabrics.  December update: neoprene and scuba won’t work for this (see comments below).

Sleeve Drama

1 Sleeve

1 Sleeve pattern

click for pdf link

The sleeves of my Refashioned Men’s Shirt attracted some comment, both here and on the Pinterest Refashioners board, so here’s the sleeve pattern in PDF and instructions for making it below.

The pattern has been created to fit me, and I have an arm girth of 25cm (10″). This is roughly a size 8 (not that my ass is size 8 🙁 ). When folded, gathered, stitched at the underarm seam and ready to attach to the bodice, the sleeve armscye has a stitching line of 47.5cm. This, coincidentally, makes it fit the bodice of Colette Aster size 4. But you can fit it to any other bodice if you know its armscye measurement simply by using the reduce/enlarge function of your photocopier and some mathematics.

The Formula

My PDF measurement x Y% = Your required measurement

So for example if your bodice armscye is 51cm, you need to enlarge by a percentage Y

47.5cm x Y = 51cm

51 / 47.5 = 1.073

1.073 (x100) = 107%

So print out the pattern at a 107% enlargement. Be brave; it’s easy.

Method

Making this is also very easy. The protruding fold covering the sleeve head can hide a multitude of sins so if setting in of sleeves isn’t your forté, your luck is in! If you lack the confidence to cut into fabric, play around with a paper version first, using pins instead of stitching (to round the sleeve head, make 2-3 little pintucks; it doesn’t have to be perfect). Or cut up some rags.

1 Sleeve pattern

Step 1 – Begin by sewing 2-3 rows of gathering stitches, into and around the 1cm seam allowance

Step 2 - with right sides together, sew the short ends of the wings...

Step 2 – with right sides together, sew the short ends of the wings…

Step 3 - and press open

Step 3 – and press open

Step 4 - fold sewn section wrong sides together and align notches with the centre sleeve head notch

Step 4 – fold sewn section wrong sides together

Step 5 - align seam with centre of the sleeve head (notches together).  Sew the underarm seam.

Step 5 – align seam with centre of the sleeve head (notches together). Sew the underarm seam.

Step - pull on the gathering stitches and fold all the raw edges to they're lined up

Step 6 – pull the gathering stitches and fold all the raw edges so they’re lined up

Step 7 - with all three layers of fabric lined up and pinned or basted, you can attach the sleeve to the garment by the usual method

Step 7 – with all three layers of fabric lined up and pinned or basted, you can attach the sleeve to the garment by the usual method

Finishing

1 sdThe original white shirt sleeve was hemmed with bias binding but the blue version has a cuff. The cuff has a 2.5cm finished height, is cut on the bias and interfaced.

Other ideas

  • When making the white shirt, I didn’t have enough fabric to cut the sleeve from a single piece so I had to split the pattern into 3 sections (the head and two wings). This has created interesting change of direction in the stripes which you may want to try.
  • Consider using the stripes of your fabric horizontally.
  • If you’re a drama queen (or would like to make a pressie for one), you can make these sleeves out of a soft voile then attach to a matching t-shirt, with more voile for a breast pocket and bias binding for the neckline.
  • For another dramatic sleeve variation, try my Status sleeves tutorial.

 

Credit

pinterest sourceThe original idea for the design came from this Pin (before any of you get ideas about me being clever; I’m just the copycat). I printed out the pattern, then enlarged it with the photocopier until I made a version that fit me, having made three toiles. I never did achieve the lavishly folded sleeve in the original picture but I’m pleased with the result nevertheless. Let me know if you uncover any more information about the source or if you have alternative ideas how to effect the lower fold.