And Add Sleeve

1 Sleeve quarter1 Royal crescent curveDo you like this: instead of a sleeve, a cap is formed from three 25cm strips of fabric in a kind of braid-arrangement looping over or under each other?  I wanted something unusual-looking to complete the asymmetrical blouse and the idea came from a cheap jersey top I bought from H&M  – don’t judge me –  probably in 2011 and which had similar sleeves.  It’s a top I kept in a rag drawer long after it wore out with the idea of copying it some day, but guess what?  I decided during a recent clear out that I was never going to find the time to copy it so I chucked it.  Oh, what a plonker!  1 Sleeve plan

Last week I spent hours puzzling over how to size the pieces and how to fit them to resemble the original’s grace and harmony.  This is Draft #1.  It looks fine but takes some adjustment (fiddling) in order to do so.

1 MaybeA tartan diversion: the pictures above were taken by my mum outside the apartment in which we were staying in Edinburgh last week.  We went there for her birthday and for me to run the Edinburgh Marathon.  Check out my pre-race bin bag couture:  no cheap black stuff for me…1 Binbag Couture

Simple Human bin bags are probably more expensive than some of the fabrics that I buy but they were all I could find under the kitchen sink on a wet Sunday morning.  Besides, the drawstring made such a handy waistband for the skirt!

You might find interesting this sample of Tartan I found in Greyfriars with the explanation of why certain colours made it into the weave.  Click to enlarge the text: it’s a good read.  I wonder what my tartan would have.  Black, of course, then green, turquoise and blue of the Dalmatian coast where I’m from.  Shocking pink is nice too!  What would you choose?  I found my recent hunt for tartan rather disappointing with all colours on offer reminding me of school kilts.

1 Greyfriars Tartan

Create Chunky Neckline Pleats

1 Chunky pleatsSo, The Vivienne Westwood Challenge!  I’ve had to postpone the deadline to a more manageable Saturday, 7th June (email  your submissions any time; I stay up late!).  If you’re trying to plump up the courage to make something, you may like this easy drafting project.  The approach is more butchery than couture but it seems to work.  You’ll end up with an asymmetric, sleeveless top (though you can add sleeves, as I will do).  It’s particularly cute if you turn your fabric on the bias.

You will need:

  • A bodice block, copied, darts moved to waist (as in this tutorial)
  • 1.5 – 2 metres, depending on your size (and whether or not you’d like sleeves) of lightweight check or plaid fabric.  Mine is a linen/cotton blend at £6 per metre from Rolls and Rems
  • Plenty of paper.  I often draft on packing paper that arrives stuffed into boxes of online shopping which I press with a hot, dry iron.

CHUNKY NECKLINE PLEATS TUTORIAL

3 trace bodice

1. Move bodice front darts to waist and trace

4 Draw neckline

2. Lower neckline by e.g. 10cm. Narrow shoulder seam to e.g. 6cm

6 Cut on double

3. Draw a more shapely side seam to desired length. Pin onto another paper layer and cut

Bodice Front ready to start

4. Join left and right (I know this looks wonky, but it’s the tilt of the camera, I think!)

1 Bodice front slash and spread

5. Draw a grainline (Centre Front). Draw where you want the pleats to appear. Extend to the seam and slash. Note how my pleats extend to the two side seams and the hem. Label pieces.

1 Straight grain to sg

6. Draw grainline on target paper. Pin grainlines together

1 Spread on target paper

7. Pin the remaining pieces in order, making sure that they’re anchored together at seams. I have deliberately made the three gaps in the neckline different measurements. e.g. 8c.m, 10cm and 9cm

1 define

8. Trace all around then remove top layer

1 Fold pleats and pin

9. Pin pleats closed (try to be accurate and press with a dry iron if necessary!)

1 add seam allowances and cut

10. Draw a seam allowance/hem allowance and cut out. Before unpinning pattern, use it to make a pattern for the facing (5cm depth plus seam allowances)


Back Bodice 

You will need to make a pattern for the back too but this is relatively simple.  You will need to:
1. Trace the Bodice Back Block/Sloper
2. Draw an elegant neckline: Firstly, lower the back of the neck by 5cm approx.  Make the shoulder seam the same width as the front of the bodice, e.g. 6cm and join to the centre with a smooth curve.
3. Place the front pattern over the back and trace the side seam and hem so they’re the same at front and back.
4.  If you have a shoulder dart in your back block, it’ll be quite reduced by the time you’ve lowered the neckline.  You can sew gathering stitches here and ease this area instead of sewing a dart in the neckline.
5. Draw seam allowances and make a pattern for the back facing.

Cutting: Remember to place the grainline on bias for a looser, more draped effect.

Ask if you have any questions about sewing the top and good luck.

1t Check linen cotton mix

Slashing

1 Chunky pleatsThis is a demo of the simplest method of dart manipulation which is slash and spread.  If you’re to alter your block by adding design lines like I’ve done to the neckline here, you might first need to move any darts that may be in the way.

Before you begin, make at least one copy of your bodice block/sloper.  Unlike with the ‘pivot method’ (explained here), you’ll be cutting and I don’t want you to destroy your original!

If, on the other hand, you came here because of the filthy-sounding post title or ’cause you’re stalking the Guitar Hero dude, go away!  There’s nothing to see 🙄

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EXAMPLE 1: moving the shoulder dart into the armscye.

Step 1
Trace the bodice front.  Draw a line from the bust point to where you want your new dart to lie on the armhole1t Bodice front move shoulder dart to armscye


Step 2

Cut the new line to bust point.  Cut one of the dart lines (legs) from the shoulder dart to the bust point and ‘close’ the dart by joining the dart legs together (use some tape).  The new dart will swing open.  1t Shoulder dart opens in armhole

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EXAMPLE 2: moving the shoulder dart to the neckline

You can put the dart anywhere between a seam and the bust point.  You can also join the two darts into one big one.  In the second example, we’re moving the dart from the shoulder seam to the neckline.

Step 1 Draw a line from bust point to a point on the neckline

1t Bodice front move shoulder dart to neck

Step 2 Cut the new line to bust point.  Cut one of the dart legs to bust point and tape the dart closed 1t Shoulder dart moved

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Challenge  Want some homework to see if you’ve got it?  OK, this time, move the shoulder dart into the waist dart.  Your bodice front will end up having a single dart, rather wide, in the waist seam.  In the next post, I’ll show you how to go from here to making a chunky pleated neckline pattern, Vivienne Westwood-style.  It’s not too difficult.  In the meantime, why not experiment a little by doodling where you want the pleats to be?1 Sketching pleat positions

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier

Ouch, my yummy chums, I’ve failed you!  I’m sorry to have to postpone the VW Challenge by a couple of weeks as I’ve not been able to give it the attention I’d intended to.  Our builder recently announced he’s ready to work on our son’s bedroom – which has for years served as storage for everyone’s stuff –  so my sewing machine has been locked away and I’ve been making myself busy as an excavator of rubbish and stripper of wallpaper!  I’m not finished yet either… 🙁Hello Sailor in white leather

Midweek however, I managed to shower off the dust and escape to the City for an exhibition I’d booked a while back: The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: from the Sidewalk to the Catwalk (at the Barbican until 25 August, then on tour).  Now, museums and galleries rarely permit photography but this time I was virtually invited by the gallery staff to take pictures as long as  I didn’t use a flash.  Whose call this was – the organizers’ or JPG’s or some third party’s – I don’t know, but the decision suggests strong confidence in the content of the exhibition without fear that the publishing of numerous, amateurish phone cam pics like mine might put off prospective visitors.

So here they are…

Jean Paul Gaultier for Grace Jones

This is Grace Jones’ dinner jacket.  Do you like how the collar is formed from what looks like facing which also connects to the back sleeve? I love that contrast of the two textures of black fabrics.

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Leopard Lady

What appeared to be a dress incorporating a real leopard skin 🙁 turned out at close inspection to be thousands of beads 😯

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Fish scale detailBlack mermaid

 A white version of this siren-like number was worn by Marion Cotillard.

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Silver mermaidSilver mermaid detail

Another mermaid dress shimmering like the insides of oyster shells.

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Peacock Suit  Hood top and trousers

A couple of favourites: a Can Can jacket and…  yeah, I know you’d need a top with that one!

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Finally, a surprise trip down memory lane with memorabilia from Eurotrash, a show which made Jean Paul Gaultier (one of the presenters) a household name.  20 years ago, Eurotrash pioneered bad-taste TV – something we’ve had enough of already – but I loved it for the playful attitude of JPG and the fantastic chemistry between him and co-presenter Antoine de Caunes.  I used to laugh like a hyena as they took the mick out of each other, and everyone else, but mostly the British in their exaggerated French accents.

1 Eurotrash

And yet, nothing could be more British than some of the designs here.  The celebration of subversive as opposed to traditional beauty.  The punk dandy; the Pearly Queen Suit (in brown) and DMs all done with that essential British ingredient which is humour.  Jean Paul Gaultier, we know you like us!

camo ballgown